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Use The AMICO Library

 

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Library Demo

Is there a demo script to help me with using The AMICO Library or showing others how?

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Yes, follow these steps
1. Connect to The AMICO Library.
2. Click on the Simple Search button, select Keyword, and then type elephant into the blank box. Click on the Search button below the box.
3. The search result will appear in the browser window and look like the one shown below. Certain aspects of the search display are explained in the hard-copy version of this demo.
4. Feel free to investigate the display features that are pointed out above to familiarize yourself with how The AMICO Library works via RLG.
5. Then, click on the Options button and change your display options, so you can compare the ways things display in your next search.
6. Click on the Simple Search button, select creator, type in degas, and then click on the Search button.
7. You will be presented with an artist name listing with checkboxes. This will help you to understand how data merged from many sources can contain variations. AMICO Members have contributed five different ways to spell Degas' name, so to get all works by Degas that are in The AMICO Library, you must select all five checkboxes. Editorial processes are underway to standardize information, so this experience should be minimized in the future.
8. Now try an Advanced Search. Click on the Advanced Search button. Select Creator and type in egyptian (remember that Creator can be a name OR a culture), select AND, then, choose Keyword and type in mumm? (remember you use a ? to truncate a word, so this will search for mummy, mummies, mummified, etc.)
9. Select another work to see what other records may include. Some entries may include additional views or details of the work. Also, some may contain multimedia associated with the work, like sound or video files. There may be detailed ownership or conservation histories about the work or suggestions for additional reading. Right now you need to click on the images from the search result list and scroll down to see what information is contained in that particular record. We are working with RLG to provide small icons at the search result level indicating the additional information types available for each work, so look for that in the future.
10. Now that you understand how things will be presented when you search, HAVE FUN! The AMICO Library allows for a great deal of serendipity for the user. One is able to combine works from a wide ranges of regions, in many formats - sculpture, decorative art, drawing, painting - and various time periods when using keywords to search. This can allow for comparisons and juxtapositions of works that you may have never experienced when using traditional research formats.
11. Use the Notebook feature, discussed in the previous section, to store interesting works that could be used in your teaching in the future. Use a logging system like the one below to store your User Name and Password and the names of the Notebooks.

Notebook User Name: ______________________ Notebook Password: _______________________

Notebook Name: ________________________
Description: ____________________________________________________
Audience: ______________________________

Notebook Name: ________________________
Description: ____________________________________________________
Audience: ______________________________

Examples of Use

How are colleges/universities using The AMICO Library? Get this info as a .PDF file

Examples of AMICO Library Use from the University Testbed Project
Academic Year 1998-1999

Art History

  • A Professor projected AMICO images in class lectures, placed AMICO works in a restricted use (students of class only) web site for study purposes, and encouraged students to look for works in The AMICO Library to illustrate class papers.
  • Another Professor asked students to use AMICO images in the online exhibitions they had to curate as a class project.
  • An assignment in a Baroque sculpture class asked students to judge a work's authenticity and to grapple with connoisseurship based on a high quality image from The AMICO Library.
  • Students used AMICO works from the Library "live" in class presentations and discussed them.

General Studies/Honors Program

  • A Professor created a multimedia web page (for students of class only) to be used as a study guide to Martin Luther's "Freedom of a Christian". The page contained sound files of J.S. Bach's "St. Matthew's Passion" and images of Dürer's Large Passion from The AMICO Library to help students enter the cultural landscape that Luther dwelled in when he wrote his religious texts.
Design and Fine Art
  • A Professor used The AMICO Library in assignments in her 3-D Design class. Students were asked to find examples of sculpture based on organic forms in The AMICO Library. The students printed out examples found and included them in their "concept scroll" to explain their creative process for making their own organic-inspired sculpture. Another assignment was based on studying solids and voids, finding images in The AMICO Library, with students creating works that explored these concepts.
  • The same professor held class using AMICO images, picking works randomly that illustrated concepts, and lecturing about them "on the fly," rather than giving a prepared slide lecture.

School of Printing

  • The AMICO Library was used in two technical courses, "Color Perception and Measurement" and "Color Separation Systems". The professors had students analyze AMICO images with regard to file consistency, the technical information they contained, and the ability to accurately reproduce the works from digital files versus color transparencies.
Multimedia Development
  • One university had students of computer science, educational technology and psychology, art history, and comparative linguistics study the formal attributes of iconography. The students used images from The AMICO Library to illustrate iconographic concepts and learned to explain these concepts to a wider audience by creating multimedia presentations.

How are K-12 schools using The AMICO Library?

AMICO has just begun a K-12 School Testbed project in order to research ways that this market segment may use The AMICO Library.

How are museums using The AMICO Library?

Members have yet to tap into using the AMICO LIbrary to its full potential. Some ideas for The AMICO Library include:

  • Use The AMICO Library to assist with Docent training
  • Bookmark your AMICO Library account on computer kiosks in your museum or in an interactive lab or museum library to let museum patrons browse works in the across Member collections
  • Research works held by other AMICO Members to help with mounting exhibits and doing curatorial research
  • Make The AMICO Library available to your Museum's Education Department to integrate Library use into school and public education programs

Are there statistics provided about the use of The AMICO Library?

Yes, you may access compiled monthly statistics about the use of The AMICO Library or you may connect to RLG's stats page to review your institution's use of the Library. To access this RLG page you will need to have your RLG password. Don't know it? Contact AMICO for help.

Images to Word & Powerpoint

How would I place an AMICO Library image into a Microsoft Word Document?
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1. Find a digital image that you want to use. Enlarge the image to level you wish, by clicking on it.
2. PC users: "Right click" on the image using the button on the right side of your mouse. A menu appears. Select Save Image As…
(Mac users: Choose 'Save as…' from the File menu.)
It is recommended to save your images in JPEG (jpg) format to insert them easily into an MS Word document.
3. A dialogue box opens and asks you where you want to save the image on your computer. Use a diskette, or choose a place on your hard drive where you can easily find the image. You may also want to rename the image so that you can easily recognize it.
4. Open a new or existing document in MS Word.
5. Go to Insert on the main menu. Select Picture, but don't let go yet! Choose From File…. Insert > Picture > From File…
6. Once you have chosen From File… another dialogue box opens and asks you to find the picture to insert. Find and select your picture. In addition to the file that contains your picture, you should be able to see the picture in the preview box next to it. When you've selected your image, click on Insert.
7. Your image should appear in your MS Word document. If you want to make changes to your image in the Word document, make sure you have your picture toolbar visible. Go to your main menu and click on View. Click on Toolbars. Click on Picture and the picture toolbar will appear. View > Toolbars > Picture. It looks like this: The Picture Toolbar allows you to format the image, crop it, change it from color to grayscale, change brightness and contrast, and wrap text.
8. When your image is in MS Word document, save it. Next, cite the work of art. See the Citation Practices below. If you want to, you can add more images and text to your Word document. Don't forget to save it!

Thanks to Dina Helal at the Whitney Museum of American Art for these instructions.

How would I place an AMICO Library image into a Microsoft Powerpoint Document?
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Part I - Capturing and Saving an Image from The AMICO Library
1. Use The AMICO Library to find an image of a work of art you'd like to use in your presentation. Click on the image to achieve the size you wish to use.
2. PC users: To save the selected image place your cursor on the image and click the right mouse button. A menu will come up on your screen. Select the Save Image As … option Mac users: Select the image and choose "Save as…" from the File menu. Make sure you are saving the image as a jpeg by checking the Save as Type box at the bottom of the menu.
3. Next, a dialogue box will appear and ask you where you want to save the image -to a floppydisk, a file folder on the hard drive, the network, etc. Select a destination for saving the file that you can easily access later.
4. Also, at this time you are able to rename the image in the File Name box. It is recommended that you do this, so you can recognize the file without having to open the image up later. If you don't, the computer will give it the original file name, something that usually has a mix of numbers and letters that will make no sense to you.
5. You have now successfully located and saved an image from The AMICO Library.

Part II - Retrieving an Image and Placing it into a PowerPoint Presentation
1. Open up the PowerPoint program.
2. First, choose the type of slide format. You will be given four choices, auto content wizard, design template, blank presentation, or open an existing presentation. It is recommended for beginners that you the blank presentation format. See illustration on the next page.
3. When you choose blank presentation, a screen will come up and will ask you to choose one of twelve slide layout options. It is suggested that beginners choose either the Text & Clip Art layout, Clip Art & Text layout, or the Blank layout. Names for the slides appear in the lower right-hand box once selected.
4. When you have chosen the layout, click the ok button. Then, a blank slide in the selected format will appear.
5. To put an image into this slide, click in the dotted area designated for a graphic file. Then go to the Menu Bar at the top of the program and select Insert.
6. A Menu Box will appear and you will scroll down to the Picture option. With the mouse button held down, as you roll over Picture a side Menu Box will appear and ask you where you would like to retrieve a picture from, Clip Art … or From File …. See the MS Word instructions for a similar illustration.
7. Select the From File … option. Another dialogue box will appear and ask you to choose a file.
8. Choose the location where you saved your image file and click on it. See the illustrations on the next page.
9. Once you are in the correct location, find your image file. Select the file name and then, click on the Insert button in the dialogue box.
10. The image will appear in your slide.
11. Adjust the image as necessary. When the image is selected eight small sizing squares will appear on each corner and the middle of each side of the image. Only use the sizing squares on the corners, so that the height and width ratios of the original artwork will be maintained. If you do use one of the squares on the sides and wish to go back to the initial inserted image, select Edit from the top Menu Bar and then choose Undo (perhaps more than once), to return to the initial image.
12. Add text to the slide in the Clip Art & Text or Text & Clip Art layout by simply clicking on the box that reads Click to add text and typing.
13. If you chose a Blank layout click on the Insert on the Menu Bar, after you have inserted the image scroll down to the Add Text option and click on it. A text box will appear on the slide. Click inside the text box and a cursor will appear, allowing you to enter text.
14. Make sure you appropriately cite all the images you use. See the Citation Practices section below. Repeat these steps for each slide you want to add an image to in your presentation.

Thanks to Chris Reynolds, AMICO Intern, at the Cleveland Museum of Art for these instructions.

Library Citations

How do you cite images from The AMICO Library?
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Just like footnotes for textual sources, it is important to accurately cite works of art when you use them as a reference source. Here are citation outlines and samples for reference purposes. Note that citation requirements differ when the work of art is still under copyright.

Use a full citation whenever possible. A brief citation is acceptable when space for the citation is limited or if you are citing the work in a paper or some sort of text document. The lines of a citation may be run together with commas "," if desired.

Full Citation:
Artist's Name (First and Last), Artist's Nationality and Dates
Title and Date of the Work (if known)
Materials and Dimensions of the Work
Museum Name and Location
Credit Line and Museum's Number
Copyright, if applicable
Image Source and ID Number

Example:
Edward Hopper, American, 1882-1967
Early Sunday Morning, 1930
Oil on canvas, 35 3/16 x 60 1/4 in. (89.4 x 153 cm)
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY, USA
Purchase, with funds from Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, 31.426
The AMICO Library: WMAA.31.426

Photo Credit © Whitney Museum of American Art

Brief Citation:
Artist's Name (First and Last)
Title and Date (if known)
Museum Name and Location
Museum's Number
Copyright, if applicable
Image Source and ID Number

Example:
Lysippides Painter
Hydria: Herakles and Cerberus with Hermes, Athena and Persephone, Ca. 520 B.C.
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Boston, MA, USA, 28.46
The AMICO Library: BMFA.28.46

Photo Credit © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

How about images still under copyright?

Full Citation (when the work of art is still in copyright):
Artist's Name (First and Last), Artist's Nationality and Dates
Title and Date of the Work (if known)
Materials and Dimensions of the Work
Museum Name and Location
Credit Line and Museum's Number
Copyright Statement
Image Source and ID Number

Example:
Jackson Pollock, American, 1912-1956
Autumn Rhythm (Number 30), 1950
Oil on canvas, 105 x 207 in. (266.7 x 525.8 cm)
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY, USA
George A. Hearn Fund, 1957 57.92
© 1999 Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
The AMICO Library: MMA_.57.92

Photo Credit © The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Brief Citation (when the work of art is still in copyright):
Artist's Name (First and Last)
Title and Date (if known)
Museum Name and Location
Museum's Number
Copyright Statement
Image Source and ID Number

Example:
Jackson Pollock
Autumn Rhythm (Number 30), 1950
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY, USA, 57.92
© 1999 Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
The AMICO Library: MMA_.57.92

Photo Credit © The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Are there guidelines for citing multimedia or commentary relating to an image in The AMICO Library?

Content Citations:
Based on review of MLA guidelines, the following are required elements for such citations:
-Author
-Title
-Compilation
-Editor
-Subscription Service
-School Name
-Date Consulted
-URL
All of these elements are fairly straightforward expect for the Title, which in some cases may have to be a constructed one, as in Catalog Record, or may be the name given to the particular piece of multimedia in the work's record in The AMICO Library.

Please compare the citations below to their actual works in The AMICO Library for needed clarification.

Example of Text Citation:
The Cleveland Museum of Art. "Catalog record for Lysippides Painter, The Bateman Amphora, c. 530-520 BC." The AMICO Library: 2000-2001, CMA_.1927.433. The Art Museum Image Consortium, Inc., Research Libraries Group, AMICO Library Subscription. Isidore Newman School, New Orleans, LA. 8 November 2000. http://eureka.rlg.org/amico

Example of Multimedia Citation:
The Art Institute of Chicago. "3-D construction of mummy's head based upon CT data for Egyptian, Mummy Case of Paankhenamun, c. 945-715 BC." The AMICO Library: 2000-2001, AIC_.1910.238. The Art Museum Image Consortium, Inc., Research Libraries Group, AMICO Library Subscription. Isidore Newman School, New Orleans, LA. 8 November 2000. http://eureka.rlg.org/amico

Example of Sound Citation:
The Minneapolis Institute of Arts. "Museum Director and CEO, Evan Maurer, leads visitors through a personal tour of some of the most popular works in the collection for Rembrandt van Rijn, Lucretia, 1666." The AMICO Library: 2000-2001, MIA_.34.19. The Art Museum Image Consortium, Inc., Research Libraries Group, AMICO Library Subscription. Isidore Newman School, New Orleans, LA. 8 November 2000. http://eureka.rlg.org/amico

Library License Terms Get this info as a .PDF file

What are allowable uses of The AMICO Library?

The AMICO Library is provided by institutional subscription, under license.

YES You MAY access and use The AMICO Library for classroom instruction and related activities including handouts, presentations, research, and student assignments.
YES You MAY use The AMICO Library as part of a professional presentation at a conference, seminar, workshop, or other professional activity or in a public display or performance in the (Institution name) gallery or similar facility.
YES You MAY use The AMICO Library for student or faculty portfolios, term papers, theses, and dissertations.
YES You MAY use AMICO Library images in course web-sites for review and study purposes, but these sites must NOT be publicly accessible on the web, but rather password-protected or constrained by user-filtering, so that only members of your school community may access the site.
YES You MAY adapt, alter, add to, delete from, manipulate, or modify an AMICO work if you're doing it exclusively for educational, research, or scholarship purposes. But, you MUST clearly identify all changes made to an AMICO work and include an appropriate citation or direct link to the unadapted AMICO work.
  (The final item is only true if a school signs a Long license agreement. Find out which license agreement your school has signed by inquiring at your campus library. Read both Short and Long licenses at http://www.amico.org)


What are prohibited uses of The AMICO Library?

NO You MAY NOT use The AMICO Library for any purposes other than education, research, or scholarship.
NO You MAY NOT use any AMICO work for any commercial or business- related purpose whatsoever.
NO You MAY NOT reproduce, distribute, re-distribute, or publish any adapted AMICO work outside of (place your Institution Name here) without obtaining permission. Follow the "Rights" link from each work to request permission.
NO You MAY NOT use any AMICO work for institutional fundraising, marketing, promotion, or public relations.

 


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