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Samples of Common Cataloging Problems
& how to deal with them in The AMICO Library

Contents

 

Have a question about how to apply the AMICO Data Dictionary?
Send it to the Editorial Committee Discussion List!

Repeating Fields

Sometimes we need to record multiple terms in the same field. To make sure that we can index these terms properly, each term gets its own occurrence of a repeating field. So, for example, if a print's state was identified by different scholars, you could record them both, each in their own field.

For simple repeating field, such as Object State OST you repeat the tag before each occurrence of a group.

Field Name Tag Data Value Output Format
View
Object State OST Bartsch III527,
variant of state II
OSTBartsch III527,
variant of state II}~
Object State OST Robinson 1997,
ii/iv
OSTRobinson 1997,
ii/iv}~

Repeating Groups

Sometimes, we want a set of fields to work together in a record, for example, to keep all of the information about one artist separate from that about her collaborator. In the AMICO Data Dictionary, we use Repeating Groups to do this.

The Group Tag (ending in G) appears before each occurrence of the fields in the group, and clusters them together meaningfully. For examples, see "Multiple Creators" and "Multiple Views of the same work"

Relationships Between Individuals: Creator Display Text (CTT)

Creator Display Text (CTT) offers a way to express meaningful relationships between various contributors to a work. 

Use of Creator Display Text (CTT) in the following example clarifies the partnership between Peter and Ann Bateman that may be obscured when recording their names in separate Creator Groups (CRG) for indexing purposes.

Field Name Tag Value Data Output View
Creator Display Text CTT Peter and Ann Bateman CTTPeter and Ann Bateman}~
       
Creator Group CRG {group tags never contain data) CRG}~
Creator Name Text CRT Peter Bateman CRTPeter Bateman}~
Creator Name CRN Bateman, Peter CRNBateman, Peter}~
       
Creator Group CRG {group tags never contain data) CRG}~
Creator Name Text CRT Ann Bateman CRTAnn Bateman}~
Creator Name CRN Bateman, Ann CRNBateman, Ann}~

Multiple Creators: Creator Group (CRG)

My work was created by two artists working together. How do I record both their names?

The Spoonbridge and Cherry created by Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen, in the sculpture garden at the Walker Art Center (WAC_.88.385) is a great example of using Repeating Groups of Fields. The collaborators are indicated with two occurrences of the Object Creator Group CRG. The record would look like this:

  Field Name Tag Value Data Output view
Creator Group CRG {group tags never contain data) CRG}~
Creator Text CRT Claes Oldenburg CRTClaesOldenburg}~
Creator Name Sort CRN Oldenburg, Claes CRNOldenburgh, Claes}~
Creator Culture CRC American CRCAmerican}~

 

  Creator Group CRG (group tags never contain data) CRG}~
Creator Text CRT Coosje van Bruggen CRTCoosje van Bruggen}~
Creator Name Sort CRN van Bruggen, Coosje CRN van Bruggen, Coosje}~
Creator Culture CRC American, Dutch CRCDutch-American}~

My work was created by an artist following the style or specific work of another.  How should this be represented?

If a work was created with reference to the work of another artist, there should be two entries in the Creator Group (CRG). The first occurrence of this field is for the artist and the second records the artist whose work inspired it. Creator Qualifier CRQ in the second entry would say "After."

JPGM.91.SE.74 provides a good example.

Field Name

Tag

Value

Data Output view

Creator Group

CRG

{group tags never contain data)

CRG}~

Creator Qualifier

CRQ

Probably modeled by

CRQProbably modeled by}~

Creator Name Text

CRT

Gennaro Laudato

CRTGennaro Laudato}~

Creator Name

CRN

Laudato, Gennaro

CRNLaudato, Gennaro}~

Creator Culture

CRC

Italian

CRCItalian}~

Creator Group

CRG

{group tags never contain data)

CRG}~

Creator Qualifier

CRQ

After a model by

CRQ After a model by}~

Creator Name Text

CRT

Giuseppe Sanmartino

CRTGiuseppe Sanmartino}~

Creator Name

CRN

Sanmartino, Giuseppe

CRNSanmartino, Giuseppe}~

Creator Culture

CRC

Italian

CRCItalian}~

Unnamed Creators: Creator Group (CRG)

The following example illustrates how to represent both named and un-named (known and unknown) creators in the Creator Record Group (CRG).

1. Named Creators

Field Name Tag Data Value Output Format View
Creator Record Group (CRG) {group tags never contain data} CRG}~
Creator Name Text (CRT) Giacomo Balla CRTGiacomo Balla}~
Creator Name (CRN) Balla, Giacomo CRNBalla, Giacomo}~
Creator Culture (CRC) Italian CRCItalian}~

2. Unnamed Creators

Record culture in CRT for records with no specific or known creator.  The CRT can be a more descriptive than the single term used for culture in the Creator Culture (CRC) field.

Field Name Tag Data Value Output Format View
Creator Record Group (CRG) {group tags never contain data} CRG}~
Creator Name Text (CRT) Chinese, Chekiang Province, Southern Song Dynasty CRTChinese, Chekiang Province, Southern Song Dynasty}~
Creator Name (CRN) Unknown CRNUnknown}~
Creator Culture (CRC) Chinese CRCChinese}~

Southern Song Dynasty would be recorded in Styles and Periods (STD).

Chekiang Province would be recorded in Creation Place (OCP).

3.  Creators with uncertain birth and death dates

The following example illustrates how to represent uncertain birth and death dates.

Field Name Tag Data Value Output Format View
Creator Record Group (CRG) {group tags never contain data} CRG}~
Creator Dates/Locations-Text (CDT) c. 1495-1565 CDTc. 1495-1565 }~
Creator-Birth-Date (CBD) 1495 CBD1495}~
Creator-Birth-Qualifier (CBQ) circa CBQcirca}~
Creator-Death-Date (CDD) 1565 CDD1565}~
Creator Death-Qualifier (CDQ) circa

CDDcirca}~

The field which is displayed to users is the Creator Dates/Locations-Text (CDT) field. Creator-Birth-Date (CBD), Creator-Birth-Qualifier (CBQ), Creator-Death-Date (CDD), and Creator Death-Qualifier (CDQ) are used for indexing purposes.

Creation Dates (OCG):

What are the differences between the fields in the Creation Dates Group (OCG)? 

The Object Creation Date group of fields records the date a work was created, in both a displayable (free text) and a searchable (numeric) form.Object Creation Date TextUse this field to express creation dates with free text. 

FIELD NAME

TAG

DEFINITION

EXAMPLES

Creation Date Text

OCT

The date on which a work was created, or the range in which its creation falls.

100 B.C. – 100 A.D.

18th century

mid to late 1950’s

Object Creation Start and Object Creation EndUse these fields to index creation dates in a searchable (numeric) form.  These fields record the outer range of dates within which you would like to retrieve this work with a search.If these indexing dates are not supplied by the Member, AMICO adds them based on <link>established rules</link>.Format the date as year, month day with no punctuation: YYYYMMDD

Creation Date Start

OCS

A number indicating the earliest possible date a work could have been created.

YYYYMMDD

1550

15641205

-0100

Creation Date End

OCE

A number indicating the latest possible date a work could have been created.

YYYYMMDD

15650614

0050

  • Enter the date as precisely as possible.
  • Do not record month and day if uncertainty exists.
  • Record B.C. dates as negative integers.
  • If the creation date is unknown, add ten years to the artist’s birth date for Object Creation Start (OCS) and use the actual death date in Object Creation End (OCE).

Object Creation Date QualifierUse this field to indicate an approximation in the earliest or latest creation date.

Creation Date Qualifier

OCQ

A qualifier indicating an approximation of the earliest or latest date.

Circa

Before

After

No later than

How should I record multiple dates for the same work?
Often, after an initial creation date, parts of a work are added or modified.  Information pertaining to any supplementary set of dates should go in a separate occurrence of the Object Creation Group (OCG).  An example is provided below.AID: TFC_.19155008

FIELD NAME

TAG

VALUE

Creation Date Text

OCT

covers 1675/1725

Creation Date Start

OCS

1675

Creation Date End

OCE

1725

 

FIELD NAME

TAG

VALUE

Creation Date Text

OCT

additions dating from the second half of the 19th

century

Creation Date Start

OCS

1850

Creation Date End

OCE

1899

 

FIELD NAME

TAG

VALUE

Creation Date Text

OCT

frames made in the late 19th or early 20th century; carved and gilt

Creation Date Start

OCS

1875

Creation Date End

OCE

1925

How should I express dates for a work that is ongoing?

For these works, provide a free text description indicating such in Creation Date Text (OCT).  Record the Library Year in which it will be contributed as Creation Date End (OCE).

FIELD NAME

TAG

VALUE

Creation Date Text

OCT

1988- present; ongoing

Creation Date Start

OCS

1988

Creation Date End

OCE

2002 (Current Library Year)

Creation Date Qualifier

OCQ

Multiple Views of the Same Work: Related Image Group (RIG)

How do I link more than one image to a work? How does AMICO decide which one goes in the Thumbnail Catalog?

Repeating Groups are also used to link multiple view to a catalog record. Each image is described in a Related Image Group. The Related Image Preferred (RIP) field is used to indicate which image is the 'main' one that should appear in the Thumbnail Catalog, in short lists and search results.

So, for example, the images linked to the Mummy Case of Paankhenamun (AIC_.1910.238) would look like this:

  Field Name Tag Value Data Output view
Related Image Group RIG (group tags never contain data) RIG}~
Related Image Preferred RIP Y RIPY]~
Related Image Description RID Front View RIDFront View
Related Image Relationship RIR HasFormat RIRHasFormat}~
Related Image Link RIL AIC_.E22927.TIF

RILAIC_.E22927.TIF}~


  Field Name Tag Data Value Output Format
Related
Image Group
RIG (group tags never
contain data)
RIG}~
Related
Image
Preferred
RIP N RIPN]~
Related
Image
Description
RID View of top of
Head
RIDView of top of
Head}~
Related
Image
Relationship
RIR HasFormat RIRHasFormat}~
Related
Image Link
RIL AIC_.E31636.TIF

RILAIC_.E31636.TIF}~


  Field Name Tag Data Value Output Format
Related
Image Group
RIG (group tags never
contain data)
RIG}~
Related
Image
Preferred
RIP N RIPN]~
Related
Image
Description
RID Front View. Photo of
X-ray
RIDFront View. Photo
of X-ray}~
Related
Image
Relationship
RIR HasFormat RIRHasFormat}~
Related
Image Link
RIL AIC_.E15251.TIF

RILAIC_.E15251.TIF}~

Multiple Works Displayed within the Same Image

How do I represent a work that is shown in the same image with other works?

  • Occasionally, more than one distinct work is represented by the same image.  In cases such as these, it is possible to use the same image or “ensemble photograph” for multiple records in The AMICO Library.

    Use the Related Image Group (RIG) of an AMICO Record to clarify which object in an image belongs to which record.

    For example:

    You have an image of a five-piece tea set.  (AID: BMFA.1989.151).

    Assume that multiple records identify each component of this set.

    • To reference BMFA.sc8968.tif in each record, use the same Related Image Link (RIL).
    • Describe where the work is shown in the image in Related Image Description (RID).

    In the Record for Tea and Coffee Set AID: BMFA.1989.151

Field Name

Tag

Data Value

Output Format View

Related Images

RIG

group tags never contain data

RIG}~

Related Image Link

RIL

BMFA.sc8968.tif

BMFA.sc8968.tif}~

Related Image Description   

RID

Ensemble: Shown Top Right

RIDEnsemble: Shown Top Right}~

Related Image Relationship 

RIR

HasFormat

RIRHasFormat}~

Related Image Preferred      

RIP

Y

RIPY}~

What if the work is shown both in an image by iteslf and also in an image with a group?

  • Unlike a scenario in which all components are only pictured together, here a single image is the Preferred Image, and a group image provides an alternate view.

    Both a single image and a group image are linked to the record for the work.  Thhe first Related Image Group (RIG) describes the image of the single work, while the second (shown below) places it within a larger context of related works.

    Use the Related Image Group (RIG) of an AMICO Record to show how the different images are associated with a record.

    For the Work                

    Shields Landon ('S.L.') Jones.
    Guitarist. 1976
    Smithsonian American Art Museum. No. 1986.65.382A-B.

    there would be two Related Image Groups:

Field Name

Tag

Data Value

Output Format View

Related Image Group

RIG

group tags never contain data

RIG}~

Related Image Preferred

RIP

Y

RIPN}~

Related Image Description

RID

Full View

RIDFull View}~

Related Image Relationship

RIR

HasFormat

RIRHasFormat}~

Related Image Link

RIL

SAAM.1986.65.383A-B.tif

RILSAAM.1986.65383A-B.tif}~


Field Name

Tag

Data Value

Output Format View

Related Image Group

RIG

group tags never contain data

RIG}~

Related Image Preferred

RIP

N

RIPN}~

Related Image Description

RID

Ensemble

RIDEnsemble}~

Related Image Relationship

RIR

HasFormat

RIRHasFormat}~

Related

 Image Link

RIL

SAAM.1986.65.383A-B_2.tif

RILSAAM.1986.65383A-B_2.tif}~

Use the Related Works of Art (RWG) record group to describe relationships between the works represented in a group image. 

The following example shows how our Guitarist is related to two other objects in The AMICO Library.

            In the Record for the Guitarist  AID: SAAM.1986.65.382A-B

Field Name

Tag

Data Value

Output Format View

Related Works of Art

RWG

group tags never contain data

RWG}~

Related Works Description   

RWD

Part of an ensemble with ''Banjoist''

RWDPart of an ensemble with

''Banjoist''}~

Related Works Relationship 

 RWR

References

RWRReferences}~

Related Works Link               

 RWL

SAAM.1986.65.383A-B

RWLSAAM.1986.65.383A-B}~


Field Name

Tag

Data Value

Output Format View

Related Works of Art

RWG

group tags never contain data

RWG}~

Related Works Description   

RWD

Part of an ensemble with ''Fiddler''

RWDPart of an ensemble with

''Fiddler''}~

Related Works Relationship 

 RWR

References

RWRReferences}~

Related Works Link               

 RWL

SAAM.1986.65.250A-C

RWLSAAM.1986.65.250A-C}~

Related Works (RWG)

We have sketches for this painting in our collection...How do I relate these works to each other?

Works are related to each other in The AMICO Library by using the Related Works Group. This makes it possible, for example, to link together multiple pieces of a set that have been cataloged individually. This relationship is described and the related work identified in the two fields in the group.

Field Name Tag Data Value Output Format
View
Related Work Group RWG (group tags never
contain data)
RWG}~
Related Work Description RWD One of a pair of Chimney Pieces, the other of which is also in the BMFA collection RWDOne of a Pair of Chimney Pieces, the other of which is also in the BMFA collection}~
Related Work Link RIL BMFA.??? RWLBMFA.???}~

Related Textual References (RDG)

This work references a well-known poem. How do I relate a work of art to a document or record its publication history?

Related documents such as literary allusions or published citations to a work may be referenced in the Related Documents Group (RDG). The document is described and the relationship is identified in the fields in the group.

Field Name Tag Data Value Output Format
View
Related Documents Group RDG (group tags never
contain data)
RDG}~
Related Documents Description RDD Lord Byron, <i>The Giaour: A Turkish Tale</i>, 1813 RDDLord Byron, <i>The Giaour: A Turkish Tale</i>, 1813}~
Related Documents Relationshop Type RDR References RDRReferences}~
Related Document Link RDL    


Related Multimedia Group (RMG)

How do I relate an audio file to the catalog record for a work from our collection?

Multimedia files (such as sound, video, animation) are related to works in The AMICO Library by using the Related Media Group. The relationship between the work and the media file is described and the related media file identified in the fields in the group.

Field Name Tag Data Value Output Format
View
Related Media Group RMG (group tags never
contain data)
RMG}~
Related Media Relationship RMR isReferencedBy RMRisReferencedBy}~
Related Media Description RMD Textile artist Kaffe Fassett disscusses the inspiration of the Embroidered Box in a excerpt from the Interactive Gallery Program Material Witnesses RWDTextile artist Kaffe Fassett disscusses the inspiration of the Embroidered Box in a excerpt from the Interactive Gallery Program <i>Material Witnesses</i>n}~
Related Media Link RML MIA_.Kaffe.ram RMLMIA_.Kaffe.ram}~

Rights for Multimedia Files

Where do we record rights fields for multimedia files? If someone famous is hired to speak on an audio guide the rights are cleared and if these files are re-purposed and the rights cleared for AMICO - it seems the rights have to be indicated somewhere.

Each multimedia file must be accompanied by a metadata record. It contains a pace for Rights Statements, and also has places to record statements of responsibility for various parts of the work

Field Name Tag Data Value Output Format
View
Metadata Rights Statement XRS Sound file courtesy of Antenna Audio. XRSSound file courtesy of Antenna Audio.}~
Metadata Rights Statement XRS Photograph copyright Sheldon Collins, 1996. XRSPhotograph copyright Sheldon Collins, 1996.}~

ARS Represented Artists

How do I show that I've included a work under AMICOs' Agreement with the Artists' Rights Society?

To indicate that a work has been included in The AMICO Library under the "ARS Agreement", include the following information in the Object Rights Group (ORG). This data MUST be included for you to take advantage of AMICO's agreement with ARS.

Field Name Tag Data Value Output Format
View
Object Rights Group ORG (group tags never
contain data)
ORG}~
Object Rights Statement ORS Artists Rights Society, New York ORSArtists Rights Society, New York}~
Object Rights Link ORL http://www.arsny.com ORLhttp://www.arsny.com}~

VAGA Represented Artists

How do I show that I've included a work under AMICOs' Agreement with VAGA?

To indicate that a work has been included in The AMICO Library under the "VAGA Agreement", include the following information in the Object Rights Group (ORG). This data MUST be included for you to take advantage of AMICO's agreement with VAGA.

Field Name Tag Data Value Output Format
View
Object Rights Group ORG (group tags never
contain data)
ORG}~
Object Rights Statement ORS Copyright VAGA, New York, NY ORSCopyright VAGA, New York, NY}~
Object Rights Link ORL http://www.amico.org/rights/vaga.html ORLhttp://www.amico.org/rights/vaga.html}~

 

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